Shingles

 

Shingles: Asphaltic, Slate, Wood Shake, Tile.

Asphaltic: Asphalt shingles are an American invention first used in 1901, in general use in parts of America by 1911 and by 1939 11 million squares of shingles were being produced. A U.S. National Board of Fire Underwriters campaign to eliminate the use of wood shingles on roofs was a contributing factor in the growth in popularity of asphalt shingles during the 1920s.The forerunner of these shingles was first developed in 1893 and called asphalt prepared roofing which was similar to asphalt roll roofing without the surface granules. In 1897 slate granules were added to the surface to make the material more durable. Types of granules tested have included mica, oyster shells, slate, dolomite, fly-ash, silica and clay. In 1901 this material was first cut into strips for use as one-tab and multi-tab shingles. Two types of base materials are used to make asphalt shingles, organic and fiberglass. Organic shingles are made with a base mat of organic materials such as waste paper, cellulose, wood fiber, or other materials. This is saturated with asphalt to make it waterproof, then a top coating of adhesive asphalt is applied, covered withd solid granules. Such shingles contain around 40% more asphalt per square (100 sq ft.) than fiberglass shingles. Their organic core leaves them more prone to fire damage, resulting in a maximum class “B” FM fire rating. They are also less brittle than fiberglass shingles in cold weather. Fiberglass reinforcement was devised as the replacement for asbestos in organic mat shingles. Fiberglass shingles have a base layer of glass fiber reinforcing mat made from wet, random-laid glass fibers bonded with urea-formaldehyde resin. The mat is then coated with asphalt containing mineral fillers to make it waterproof. Such shingles resist fire better than those with organic/paper mats, making them eligible for as high as a class “A” rating. Weight typically ranges from 1.8 to 2.3 pounds/square foot.

Fiberglass shingles gradually began to replace organic felt shingles, and by 1982 overtook them in use. Widespread hurricane damage in Florida during the 1990s prompted the industry to adhere to a 1700-gram tear value on finished asphalt shingles.

Slate: Slate roofing tile has a long and storied history, and is generally known as one of the highest quality, longest lasting roofing materials on the market. On the other hand, the high cost, difficult installation, and relative fragility of slate roofing tile means it’s not ideal for everybody. Slate roofs can and should be routinely built to last at least a century. In fact, 150 years is a reasonable expectation of a roof’s longevity if the roof is properly constructed. That’s a big plus in an industry where many roofing systems are lucky to last 20 or 30 years before needing replacement. Roofing waste accounts for more than 5 percent of the total waste sent to landfills across the nation every year. Since the majority of that roofing waste can be attributed to asphalt shingle roofing that needs replacement every 20 to 30 years, it’s easy to see the positive environmental impacts of installing a roof that is going to last 100 years or more.

Wood Shake: Wood Shakes are thicker than Wood Shingles. There are two main types: (1) handsplit and resawn and (2) tapersawn. Handsplit and resawn shakes have the split face exposed with a naturally rustic appearance, and are sawn on the back. Tapersawn wood shakes are sawn on both sides for a semi-textured look with a stronger shadowline than a wood shingle. Used for both roofing and sidewalls. Recommended for use on pitches of 4:12 and steeper. All Wood Shakes are cut from clear heartwood with no defects. Heavy split and resawn Sawn on the backside, while the face is split with the natural grain of the wood. Has a highly textured surface on the exposed face. This is the heaviest type of Wood Shake, with a very rugged or rustic appearance. Available thicknesses for these shingles is 3/4″, 7/8″, 1″ and 1 1/4″+.

Medium split and resawn Similar to the heavy split and resawn shake, but not as thick or heavy. It produces a roof with a very textured appearance. Available thicknesses are 1/2″ and 5/8″.

Tapersawn Sawn on both sides like a Wood Shingle, only thicker. This shake gives a naturally tailored look of a shingle accented by the sharper shadow-line of a shake due to the thickness of the butt. It’s the most popular type of wood roof. Available thicknesses: 5/8″, 7/8″ and 1″.

Packaging: Shakes are packaged five bundles per 100 sq. ft.

Tile: Tile roofs have been around for centuries. Like any roofing product, they were created to provide a barrier between the inside of a structure and the harsh outside elements. Roof tiles are made of local, natural and recyclable materials such as terracotta (also known as clay), slate and concrete. All three of these roofing materials offer lifelong durability and fireproofing; two superior qualities that continues to set them apart from the competition. Concrete roof tiles, like those manufactured by Eagle Roofing Products, offer additional benefits including: versatility in design and color, energy efficiency, greater protection against high winds, hail and freeze/thaw climates, and they are less expensive than genuine clay or slate.